Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34���.������������.��� J��� 2016 32 By Azayaka Cosplay Hello there, cosplayers! I'm Azayaka Cosplay. I have some basic sewing techniques to share with you, which are simple, but extremely effective. Drawing from what I learned in FIDM's Theater Costume and Fashion Design programs, I've compiled a list of the techniques I personally find to be most useful. You can visit my Instagram and Facebook pages under Azayaka Cosplay to see examples of the costumes in which I've utilized these skills. GRAINLINES Let me begin by imparting essential fabric knowledge. All woven fabrics, even interfacing, have a grain. Store-bought pattern pieces have a grainline, indicating which way to position the piece on the fabric when cutting. The grain- line is meant to be parallel with the warp, or the selvage. The selvage is the edge of the fabric, on both the top and bottom, which is not cut and runs the length of the bolt. The warp is the grain of the fabric running parallel with the selvage. Perpendicular to the selvage and warp, is the weft, also known as the crossgrain. The crossgrain will be slightly stretchier than the warp, so if you have a piece of fabric with the selvage removed you can tug on the fabric to determine where the warp grain is. Lastly, the bias is the diagonal grain of a fabric and has the most stretch. Certain patterns may call for a piece to be cut on the bias, but it isn't common. More stretch isn't always better. Cutting on the crossgrain or the bias can cause odd puckering in the fabric and over time may warp the hemline of a garment. REALIGNING THE GRAINLINE When working with a woven fabric, meaning the fabric isn’t knitted and has little to no stretch (i.e. cotton, wool, silk) you may need to straighten out the grainlines in the fabric before cutting. As a fabric sits on a bolt in the fabric store and gets unrolled and rewound, the fabric can start to warp and the grainline becomes crooked. This is especially true if the fabric has been starched before it was rolled onto the bolt, which is most often the case. Depending on where the fabric is purchased, the policy may be to tear the fabric from the bolt, or to cut with scissors. Tearing fabric helps to retain a straight grain and will ensure the fabric is parted along a grainline. Some fabrics, however, must be cut with scissors, such as sheer fabrics. If the fabric has been cut rather than torn, you can make a small cut at each end of the fabric on the cross grain and tear down the length of fabric. You may be surprised to find the fabric was not cut along the crossgrain at all. Let me remind you that tearing is not used for all fabrics; it works best for fabrics made from natural fibers. BLOCKING Before cutting a woven fabric, it should be washed, if possible, or at least ironed to remove the starch. Af- terwards, check the grainline to make sure its straight. If you fold the fabric in half long ways, with the fold being on the weft grain, and the selvage edges do not seem to match, the fabric is likely off-grain. There are two methods you can use to realign the grain. Firstly, you can cut off the selvage. With some fabrics the grain becomes warped when the selvage is woven in and cannot be straightened unless removed. On some occasions, the fabric visibly puckers at the selvage and should absolutely be removed before cutting. Another method of straightening the grain of the fabric is blocking. Blocking involves tugging the corners of the fabric until the grainlines are straight and each corner creates a 90-degree angle. After this, you are ready to cut your fabric. FLATLINING So you know how to ensure your fabric is on grain and you know which grain to cut your fabric pieces along. But the fabric you chose doesn't seem to behave like it does on the char- acter you're cosplaying. It looks so stiff and voluminous on the character, but so flat on you. A wonderful technique used in the costume industry can help add some body to your fabric: SEWING AND CUTTING BASICS fabric sits on a bolt in the fabric store and gets unrolled and rewound, the fabric can start to warp and the grainline becomes crooked. This is especially true if the fabric has been starched before it was rolled onto the bolt, which is most often the case. Depending on where the fabric is purchased, the policy may be to tear For Cosplay and Every Day